About You

We strive to please customers who appreciate the value we bring in terms of risk reduction, cost and time saving, and the ‘amount of ground’ we can cover in a day.

In terms of deliverables, our ideal clients understand the merits they bring in terms of efficiency and information delivered to stakeholders, decision-makers, and the workforce at large.

Whilst we’re able to integrate into any stage of a project’s life cycle including corrective and emergency inspections, we deliver best value when we’re brought in at the beginning of a project, and utilised through to the end of construction and into the ongoing operations of the business.

CAA Permission & Safety

Our safety record and ongoing relationship with the CAA and airspace authorities means that we can steer you through the often complicated process of signing off an aerial job, making it safe, legal and accountable.

There can be a lot to organise in the planning stage, but we’ve worked with high-profile clients in some of the most challenging and congested environments out there, so you can rest assured that if it’s possible, we can make it happen.

See our CAA ‘Permission for Commercial Operations’ (PfCO) document on this page, which is the official document declaring a UAV operator’s legitimacy to perform commercial work. This includes a permission for night time operations, which is not given as standard. Please be aware that any other UAV operator who does not have a valid PfCO is flying illegally, and will not be insured.

If you’d like to download our PfCO for closer reference, please click the link below.

Our Crew

Skyhook’s crew members unite the diverse skillsets of a professional UAV operation.

We’ve created a reliable, qualified team who know their way around a work site as much as they understand the intricacies of a flight control system, and can draw up a risk assessment as well as they can process meaningful data once flights are complete.

We love our jobs, we know our stuff and a happy client is what drives us forward every day.

Frequently Asked Questions

How high can you fly?

The CAA stipulates a UAV flight ceiling of 400 feet (120 metres). This is to keep a safe separation zone from the airspace of full size aircraft, which must keep to a minimum in-flight altitude of 500 feet.

In special circumstances and if certain safety precautions are taken, applications can be made to the CAA to fly above the flight ceiling, even in built-up areas.

How close can you fly to people or buildings?

Flights cannot be made overhead of members of the public without their prior knowledge and consent. Between the UAV and people, property or roads not under our control, a horizontal separation zone must be maintained of 30m while taking off and landing, and 50m during flight (see clause 2 (e) of our PfCO). 

This separation zone does not apply to clients or staff on site – they will be have been briefed of the presence of the drone before flights take place, putting them under the control of the pilot.

As long as we have notified and received consent from neighbouring residents or businesses, we can fly as close as is necessary.

Within the UK, in certain situations requiring flights within 150 metres of built-up areas or large crowds, Skyhook must make an application to the Civil Aviation Authority for clearance. Approval of this application can take up to 14 days, so shoot locations and dates must be given to Skyhook with enough time for this process to be carried out. Please get in touch for more information on this.

Can you fly in rain / wind?

We can fly in wind speeds of up to 30mph gust, in a temperature range of -10°C to 40°C.

Some of our aircraft are water resistant, though if taking pictures that rely on clarity, little can be done for rain on the lens, so we strongly advise on zero precipitation for jobs like this.

For mapping jobs where the camera is facing straight down towards the ground, this reduces the chance of water on the lens, so we can be more flexible here in terms of precipitation.

What if the weather is bad on the day of my job?

When you book a date with us, we automatically include 1 day either side for weather contingency. As the date approaches, we use advanced forecasting services to monitor the weather on that date. Up to 48 hours before the shoot, either Skyhook or the Client can make the call that the weather will be unsuitable, and the shoot can be rebooked at no extra charge. Please get in touch for more information on our weather terms.

How long can you be airborne per flight?

This depends on factors including the specific aircraft, temperature, weather conditions and the weight of the payload, but it’s usually between 10 and 20 minutes per flight. We can land, replace batteries and take off again within a couple of minutes.

Can I see the image while you are airborne?

We have a live video downlink to our ground station, with a separate monitor for the client. We usually recommend that the client or a representative is present on the day to give live feedback as the job happens, e.g. a surveyor guiding the pilot to points of interest discovered during the flight.

Can you fly indoors?

Yes, and we’re also insured for this. In addition to the skilled piloting required to fly in these spaces, many of our drones also have collision avoidance sensors.

Zoom lenses also help us to inspect certain items at more detail, whilst flying at a safe distance from the subject.

For flights in confined, hazardous or structurally unsound places, please see the information on our collision-tolerant drone.

Can you fly any route?

We can fly any route, as long as it is safe. Most of our flying is done manually by our skilled pilots, but we also make use of autonomous flights for the purposes of mapping, where the drone is programmed to fly in grid section (like a lawnmower) up and down the site to take the images which will be stitched to create the map.

Flying these ‘waypoint missions’ can be repeated, and will allow the creation of maps showing the progress of a site’s construction over time.

You haven’t answered my question!

If there’s anything else you would like to know, please get in touch via the Contact page. We’d love to hear from you!

Ed Vereker
Surveyor - Savills Commercial Ltd.

We used Skyhook to inspect several large light industrial unit roofs as part of a dilapidations survey. Viewing on a dedicated monitor we were able to clearly view the roofs and rainwater goods for defects and collect the relevant data required for the schedule. Had we used a cherry picker for the inspection, it would have taken four times longer than using the drone.

Robin Goodlet
Development & Planning Director - Eco World International

Skyhook impressed with their thorough approach to the challenges of UAV flights at our Battersea site. Whilst on site they operated in a safe and responsible manner, managing risk by ensuring that crane operators and other traffic were aware of their movements. The end product was of high quality, and our management team in Kuala Lumpur received the files before the end of the day.

Ken Hilaire
Thames Oilport

The quality and value of Skyhook’s work went beyond all my expectations. Despite our strict health & safety requirements and the poor weather conditions, they still managed to carry out the brief. Very much customer focused with on time delivery. I’d highly recommend them to anyone seeking aerial mapping and inspection services.

John Wallis
Wallis Conservation

Hiring Skyhook was far more cost effective than using a crane or cherry picker. The images allowed us to zoom in and assess damage to determine the required repairs. This cut the survey process from 3-4 days down to 6hrs. We will certainly use their services again.

Dr. Michael Parmar
Dharart Ltd.

We had to survey a large warehouse roof and guttering detail where crane access was difficult to organize and wouldn’t provide visuals of the entire roof. Skyhook’s service using a drone provided fantastically clear, stable, high-resolution imagery of the necessary detail we were after, took a fraction of the time to complete at a fraction of the cost. I don’t see us ever using a hoist to survey a roof again.